Ontario is a Global Leader in Concussion Research and Prevention

Concussions are a serious problem in Ontario. Between 2008 and 2016, more than a million Ontarians were diagnosed with this common form of traumatic brain injury. Children and youth make up 40 per cent of all concussion patients in the province (totalling roughly 60,000 doctor visits per year), with children under five the most likely to be affected.

The ubiquity of these injuries has put brain injury lawyers on notice. Research suggests that even mild traumatic brain injuries can have major long-term health impacts. This is especially true when they occur in children and youths: kids with brain injuries do less well in school, are more likely to receive disability benefits as adults, and are more likely to be hospitalized with psychiatric illnesses, according to the Guardian.

Ontario is a World Leader in Concussion Research and Prevention

Over the past several years, Ontario has established itself as a national and even global leader in concussion research and prevention. In 2018, the provincial government passed Rowan’s Law, legislation named in memory high school rugby player Rowan Stringer who died after suffering multiple concussions in quick succession. The law lays out regulations for youth sports leagues and educational institutions, and provides guidelines to help coaches and teachers recognize and prevent head injuries.

More recently, the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation published a new ‘living guideline’ to help reduce childhood and youth concussions. Aimed primarily at doctors but featuring sections for coaches and parents, the Living Guideline for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion was created over three years by a group of more than 50 physicians, nurses, diagnosticians, and rehab specialists. The resource can be accessed online by users around the world.

“We want to harmonize the messages so it doesn’t matter where you are injured, people will be getting the same messages,” said Judy Gargaro, acquired brain injury program director at the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, to the Ottawa Citizen.

The foundation’s previous guideline, published in 2014, attracted users from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Australia, and New Zealand. What sets the new version apart is its dynamism – contributors will review new concussion research and make revisions and updates at least once a month. The recent surge in interest in concussions – from brain injury lawyers, the general population, and medical professionals alike – makes this a necessary feature.

“People are much more aware of concussion,” said Dr. Roger Zemek of the CHEO Research Institute to the Citizen. “My own work has shown that visits have increased four-fold in emergency rooms and family physicians offices over 10 years.”

As the healthcare industry has come to recognize the scope of the concussion problem, treatment best practices have evolved quickly. Until recently, for example, young people who suffered concussions were generally instructed to disconnect from screens, school, social activities, and sports until their symptoms cleared up. The new guideline recommends 24 to 48 hours of rest followed by a gradual reintroduction of physical activities.


“We need to consider that locking people away from their lives and all the things that make them smile may be causing some secondary harm,” said Dr. Nick Reed, an associate professor at the University of Toronto and one of the co-project leads, to the Globe and Mail.

How Can a Brain Injury Lawyer Help?

In a perfect world, Ontario’s aggressive approach to tackling concussions will reduce their prevalence and act as a blueprint for the rest of Canada. For now, though, concussions remain a major concern for brain injury lawyers, particularly as they relate to young people. If your child has suffered a brain injury in an accident, a brain injury lawyer may be able to help your family access compensation for the damages you have suffered. Not every accident causing a concussion will be grounds to launch a personal injury claim – reach out today to discuss your options.

Contact Will Davidson LLP

If you or a member of your family has been injured in an accident, contact Will Davidson LLP today to schedule a free, no-obligation consultation. Our team of experienced brain injury lawyers has represented seriously injured accident victims for decades. We will happily review the specifics of your case to determine whether a personal injury claim makes sense.

Will Davidson LLP provides legal services on a contingency basis, which means you will never be asked to pay fees until your claim has been successfully resolved. In other words, rather than charging hourly fees, our team will accept a percentage of your final settlement as payment – if you do not receive a settlement, we do not get paid.

Contingency fees, along with free consultations, are part of our commitment to access to justice for all Ontarians. During our decades in practice, we have come to understand that serious personal injuries present numerous complex challenges. A long-term recovery effort takes more than a physical toll; it may also affect your mental health, family dynamics, and personal finances. Contact us today to learn more.

Image credit: U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Jonathon Fowler

Social Media and Personal Injury Claims

Social media was once dominated by teens and college students. Not anymore: today, Canadians of all ages and backgrounds, from Newfoundland to British Columbia to Nunavut, tend to post, like, and comment on a daily basis. Nearly three quarters of Canadians (74 per cent) spend at least 3-4 hours online per day, according to the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA), and more than 60 per cent engage on social media. The social internet’s growing role in our lives has implications for everyone, including personal injury lawyers and plaintiffs seeking compensation.

How can Social Media Hurt My Personal Injury Claim?

Plaintiffs seek compensation in personal injury lawsuits when their life has been significantly disrupted. Serious physical injuries – brain injuries, spinal injuries, chronic pain, etc. – are common in these claims. In order to prove that their client has been injured, personal injury lawyers turn to testimony from expert medical witnesses, friends, family members, and other sources.

The compensation that a plaintiff receives depends on the extent of their injuries. Larger settlements are reserved for injury victims whose lives have been most seriously altered, including individuals who are no longer able to earn a living, or who will require constant medical care. Less serious injuries tend to result in lower compensation.

When a social media post contradicts a plaintiff’s claims, the judge, mediator, or arbitrator may choose to reduce compensation. Defence lawyers often scour plaintiffs’ social media posts in search of evidence to refute their claims. For example: if a plaintiff alleges that her injuries prevent her from socializing, but a Facebook post emerges showing her at a restaurant or bar with friends, the validity of her claim will be thrown into question.

How to Prevent Social Media Hurting My Claim

The best way to avoid hurting your personal injury claim through social media is to stay away from the platforms altogether. Delete your Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat accounts for the duration of your case.

This is a drastic step, of course, especially considering that many personal injury lawsuits drag on for years. The more reasonable solution is to set all your accounts to private mode and consider very carefully what content you share. Discuss with your personal injury lawyer what sort of posts are safe and which could put you in trouble.

Contact Will Davidson LLP

If you or a member of your family has been injured in an accident, contact Will Davidson LLP’s team of Oakville personal injury lawyers to learn how we can help.

June is Brain Injury Awareness Month in Canada

Brain Injury Awareness Month, which occurs every June in Canada, is an important event for the country’s brain injury lawyers, safety activists, and public health and safety officials. It is an opportunity to draw attention to the prevalence of brain injuries in Canada and to the serious health challenges they cause.

More than 20,000 people per year are hospitalized with traumatic brain injuries and concussions in Canada. In 2016-17 alone, hospital emergency departments diagnosed around 46,000 concussions in children and youth. Yet, despite these lofty numbers, most brain injuries are preventable. During Brain Injury Awareness Month, stakeholders aim to educate Canadians on how to avoid brain injuries in themselves and others. In 2015, for example, then-Health Minister Rona Ambrose advised Canadians to take these precautionary measures in a release:

  • Operate motor vehicles safely and without the distraction of mobile devices
  • Wear proper headgear for sports like hockey, football and biking
  • Take action to prevent falls among older adult in their homes and communities
  • Ensure playing areas are clear of hazards, and
  • Follow proper safety procedures when taking part in organized sports and other activities.

Another important aspect of Brain Injury Awareness Month is supporting organizations that research brain injuries and provide services to survivors. Some of these organizations include:

  • Parachute Canada, an organization which works to reduce preventable injuries and collaborated with the federal government on the Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport
  • The Ontario Brain Injury Association (OBIA), which provides and disseminates information and educational tools relating to all aspects of acquired brain injury
  • The Brain Injury Society of Toronto (BIST), a non-profit organization supporting acquired brain injury survivors in Canada’s largest city, and
  • The Canadian Traumatic Brain Injury Research Consortium, which receives funding through the Canadian Institutes for Health Research and recently embarked on a project to identify biomarkers to improve assessment of concussions in children.

As Ontario’s brain injury lawyers know, a serious brain injury can occur to anyone at any time. Traumatic brain injuries are often addressed in personal injury lawsuits involving car accidents, slip-and-falls, cycling accidents, boating accidents, and more.

If you or a member of your family have experienced a head injury as a result of an accident, contact Will Davidson LLP today to learn how our experienced team of brain injury lawyers can help. Our group will provide the advice, guidance, and representation you need to secure compensation to fund your recovery.

Image credit: University of the Fraser Valley

Low-income kids at higher risk of being hit by cars in Ontario

A new study conducted by researchers at Sick Kids Hospital, York University, and ICES (formerly Clinical Evaluative Sciences) shows that Ontario children living in low-income areas are more likely to be struck by vehicles than children in high-income areas, a fact that may not surprise personal injury lawyers. The researchers examined emergency room data from 2008 to 2015 from hospitals across the province.

“Simply put, poorer children are at increased risk of getting hit by cars,” lead study author Dr. Linda Rothman told CTV News. “Child pedestrian injury is a public health and equality issue.”

The study uncovered some positive findings, as well: emergency room visits by children struck by vehicles fell 18 per cent during the study period, including 22 per cent for kids living in high-income areas and 14 per cent for kids living in low-income areas. Unfortunately, that translates to high-income children visiting emergency rooms at a 48 per cent lower rate.

“Although progress has been made in reducing preventable pedestrian motor vehicle collisions, more work remains to be done,” Dr. Rothman said. “Our streets should be safe for all children to walk to school, to the playground or to the park.”

The researchers attributed the stark gap in collision rates in part to infrastructure differences.

“Recent research has found differences in road safety features in high-income versus low-income areas,” the report reads. “A request-based process in many cities in relation to installing traffic safety features such as speed humps may favour communities with higher income levels.”

The solution? Close the infrastructure gap by installing traffic signals, road narrowing protocols, speed bumps, and other traffic calming measures in low income districts.

The personal injury lawyers at Will Davidson LLP believe in equal access to justice for all Ontarians, which is why we provide our services on a contingency basis, meaning clients aren’t asked to pay legal fees until their case has been successfully resolved and compensation awarded. We also provide free, no-obligation consultations to accident victims in need. When you’re injured, you and your family should have access to fair and reasonable compensation, regardless of your income level.

If you or a member of your family has been injured in a motor vehicle accident, contact Will Davidson LLP today to arrange a consultation with our experienced team of personal injury lawyers. We will provide the advice and guidance you need to make informed decisions about your legal options and your recovery process.

Image credit: Pete/Wikimedia Commons

Ontario Aims to Restore $2M Accident Benefits Limit

Personal injury lawyers across Ontario cried foul in 2016 when accident benefits available to catastrophically injured patients were slashed from $2-million to $1-million. The latest provincial budget, released April 11, pledges a “return to the default benefit limit of $2 million for those who are catastrophically injured in an accident.” Stakeholders have embraced the announcement, but maintain concerns regarding accident victims’ future wellbeing.

“I think the $2 million restoration would be applauded by most people who practice in personal injury law,” Federation of Ontario Law Associations chairman Mike Winward told Law Times. “Just about anybody who has had a catastrophic case since the limit went down would tell you it’s not sufficient. The $2 million impacts, in the most positive way, the people who have the most serious injuries in car accidents. It impacts them tremendously. The impact to the lawyers is, it certainly allows us to serve our clients better because we have far more funding to get the services and goods that they need.”

For individuals with serious, life-changing brain or spinal cord injuries, the $1-million accident benefits limit that has prevailed since June 2016 often proved woefully insufficient. When an injury victim requires home renovations, attendant care, prolonged medical therapy, and other services, $1-million can be exhausted quickly.

However, personal injury lawyers will have to learn more about the Progressive Conservative government’s policies before fully celebrating the new budget. For example, will the province restore the pre-2016 definition of a catastrophic injury, which was dramatically narrowed under the previous government? And will the $2-million in benefits once again be delivered in separate, $1-million parcels?

The provincial budget also announced a review of contingency fees, stating that the government will “work with the Law Society of Ontario to make contingency fee agreements more transparent for injured claimants who choose to hire a lawyer.”

Increased transparency is in every client and personal injury lawyer’s best interest; however, contingency fees are crucial to ensuring access to justice for Ontarians, and law firms will want assurance that they can continue to offer these agreements.

If you or a member of your family has been catastrophically injured in an accident, the Ontario Government’s recent budget should be met with relief. The restoration of the $2-million default benefits limit could mean the difference between a full, successful recovery and one which is stunted by insufficient funding.

For more information about how Will Davidson LLP can help, contact us today to arrange a free, no-obligation consultation. Our team of experienced personal injury lawyers will help you understand your legal options and provide guidance as you pursue compensation.

Ontario Government announces higher legal fees

On April 1, the Government of Ontario enacted changes to court fees and fee waiver eligibility under the Administration of Justice Act. The changes, which have already been criticized by some personal injury lawyers, are intended to bring the province closer to “full cost recovery,” the Ministry of the Attorney General told the CBC.

Legal fees in Ontario had remained stagnant in the 15 years prior to the changes. The new rates will reflect the cost of doing business today; according to the Ministry’s statement to the CBC, the provincial government recovered less than a third of its costs prior to April 1 update.

Unfortunately, many in the legal community believe the rate changes will disproportionately affect people whose ability to pay legal fees was already tenuous. Individuals who choose to represent themselves in court will be particularly stretched. One civil litigator in Ottawa told the CBC that the move “seems to be keeping people out of the courthouse.”

At Will Davidson LLP, our team of experienced personal injury lawyers believes passionately that every Ontarian deserves full access to justice. We offer free, no-obligation consultations and work on contingency to support this aim.

Legal professionals have also expressed confusion regarding the structure of the fee increases. Among the almost 80 changes enacted, increases range from a few dollars to double the pre-April 1 cost.

For example, the cost of filing a lawsuit rose just seven dollars, but advancing lawsuits through the civil court system will now be significantly more expensive. In the small claims court, the price of applying to appear before a judge has doubled, to $180; the price of setting a trial date in civil cases has also doubled, to $810; and the price of scheduling a hearing in family court is now $420. These elevated expenses may prevent some lawyers from working on a contingency basis, and may push others to delay setting trail dates.

“In Ottawa, we often don’t get a date for two or three years,” one Ottawa personal injury lawyer told the CBC. “The processes of moving toward trial is painfully slow. So getting something down for trial as soon as possible is very important because if you don’t, you may be making an injured person wait many years.”

One change that will benefit plaintiffs, however, is being made to fee waiver eligibility. Prior to this April, plaintiffs had to make less $24,000 per year to qualify for a waiver; today, plaintiffs making less than $30,000 will qualify.

If you or a member of your family has been injured in an accident, contact Will Davidson LLP today to learn how we can help. Our experienced team of personal injury lawyers will provide advice and guidance as you initiate your claim.

Spring Safety Risks in Ontario

It’s spring in Ontario! After a long winter, it’s time to get out of the house and enjoy everything the province has to offer. As any personal injury lawyer will tell you, part of thoroughly enjoying a new season is being aware of the injury risks it presents. Spring weather may not be as dangerous as winter, but Ontarians should be careful, nonetheless.

“We’re in the middle of a transition from one season to the next,” said Kristan Hoffman, a consultant for Ontario Workplace Safety and Prevention Services (WSPS), in a release last year. “We are still getting some winter hazards, starting to see some summer hazards, while managing some unique spring hazards. It’s a unique time of the year.”

Winter, spring, and summer hazards all at once? Sounds like early April. Here are a few things to keep in mind this month and for the rest of the season.

Weather

Spring is a transitional season, meaning the weather tends to oscillate between winter cold and summer warmth. The rapidly changing air temperature can cause unpredictable storm events – you might experience snow on Monday, thunderstorms on Wednesday, and clear sunny skies on Friday.

The takeaway: plan ahead. Whether you’re heading out for a weekend hiking trip or leaving for your half-hour commute to work, preparing for inclement weather reduces your risk of injury.

Water, water everywhere

Sticking with the weather theme, spring is ground zero for high-water and flooding events. There are two key contributors to this problem: melting snow and ice, and heavy rains. Drastic temperature increases cause rapid melts that swell rivers and streams. When these events are followed by thunderstorms, rivers can overflow causing significant flooding.

High-water periods can cause a variety of problems, from property damage to personal injuries. Check your weather listings and local news regularly during the spring; both should issue warnings of potential flood conditions.

Dangerous driving

Spring is a deceptively risky driving season. Sure, road conditions aren’t as bad as during the winter, but ice patches and slippery surfaces are common until late in the season, and flooding or heavy rain can be just as problematic as an Ontario blizzard.

Spring’s high-water events and freeze-thaw cycles are also tough on the roads themselves, causing potholes, cracks, and debris. Be ready for these conditions when you’re on the road.

Slip and fall

Slip and fall injuries are dangerous throughout the year, spring being no exception. As we already mentioned, ice patches and slippery surfaces aren’t exclusive to winter. Wet and muddy conditions are common in stores, public stairways and parking lots during the spring, and can cause serious injuries. Take your time and wear sensible footwear when the weather turns sour this April and May.

Contact a personal injury lawyer

If you or someone you know suffers an injury this spring, contact Will Davidson LLP’s Oakville offices to arrange a free no-obligation consultation with an experienced personal injury lawyer.

New Ontario distracted driving laws come into effect in January

In June 2018, the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) announced that distracted driving was the leading cause of traffic accidents in the province, making it as much a threat to public safety as drunk driving, drug-impaired driving, or dangerous driving. The announcement was unlikely to surprise Ontario car accident lawyers, but it may have come as a shock to the general public.

At the time, the government’s preventative efforts focused strongly on public education. The OPP and Ministry of Transportation partnered with local stakeholders to initiate awareness campaigns.

“A lot of kids follow their parents’ footsteps, so if they see their parents texting they might think it’s OK. They see their parents smoking they might think it’s OK,” said Holly Allen, a project coordinator with Kingston: Partners for a Safe Community in an interview with Global News this summer. “Trying to educate everyone is the goal, but educating parents first and foremost.”

Durham region also initiated a public messaging campaign underlining the dangers of the ‘Big Four Killers’ on Ontario roads: distracted driving, impaired driving, aggressive driving, and driving without a seatbelt.

Unfortunately, education may not be enough to prevent Ontarians from driving while distracted. In a survey conducted by Desjardins, which we discussed at length in a previous blog about distracted driving, a majority of respondents suggested that only fines and higher insurance premiums would push them to reconsider their distracted driving habits.

In 2019, they will get what they asked for. As part of changes to the provincial Cannabis, Smoke-Free Ontario and Road Safety Statute Law Amendment Act, distracted driving will be punished more harshly in come January. First time offenders will face a maximum fine of $1,000, a three-day license suspension, and three demerit points; second time offenders will face a $2,000 fine, seven-day license suspension, and six demerit points; and subsequent offences will provoke up to $3,000 in fines and a 30-day suspension. In other words, Ontario will have the harshest distracted driving penalties in the country.

“Safety is our top priority,” Minister of Transportation Jeff Yurek told the CBC in an email. The legislation, he added, “allows the province to address unsafe driving behaviours including careless and impaired driving with tough new rules and penalties that will improve road safety.”

While Ontario car accident lawyers are sure to support the new measures, most will caution that neither public education nor harsher penalties will reduce distracted driving on their own. The province and its municipalities must enact comprehensive distracted driving strategies to meaningfully improve road safety in Ontario.

If you or a member of your family has been injured in a motor vehicle accident, contact Will Davidson LLP’s team of experienced Ontario car accident lawyers today to learn how we can help.

When are employers responsible for the actions of holiday party-goers?

Office holiday parties, in addition to being the highlight of many employees’ years, occupy a legal grey area in the Canadian civil justice system. When an attendee causes or suffers a serious injury, personal injury lawyers are challenged to discern who precisely is responsible.

If the office party is held at a staff member’s home, rules surrounding social host liability will apply. If the event occurs at a licensed establishment, we may look at commercial host liability. If the injuries relate to an improperly maintained property, the Occupiers’ Liability Act is likely to hold answers. Injuries related to authorized marijuana or alcohol consumption on a business’s premises, however, are not governed by these areas.

As we discussed in our recent blog on social host liability, the decision in the Supreme Court of Canada case Childs v. Desmoreaux states that “a social host at a party where alcohol is served is not under a duty of care to members of the public who may be injured by a guest’s actions, unless the host’s conduct implicates him or her in the creation or exacerbation of the risk.” Commercial hosts, as all Oakville personal injury lawyers know, are bound by a long history of case law to take positive steps to prevent their patrons from drinking and driving.

Because businesses owe their employees a certain duty of care, employer host liability falls somewhere between social host liability and commercial host liability. It is most likely to be applied in situations where an employer provides marijuana or alcohol to staff, is aware of an employee’s intoxication, and fails to take sufficient steps to prevent the employee from driving.

The 2002 case Hunt v. Sutton Group Incentive Realty Inc. dealt with approximately this scenario. Hunt attended and consumed alcohol at an office holiday party at her employer’s premises. Her drinking was unrestricted and unmonitored. Following the party, she drove to a pub where she continued to consume alcohol. On her drive home from the pub, Hunt crossed into oncoming traffic and was seriously injured in an accident. It was determined at trial that Hunt’s employer breached its duty of care to maintain a safe workplace.

“…the defendant Sutton, as the plaintiff’s employer, did therefore owe a duty to the plaintiff, as its employee to safeguard her from harm,” the trial judge wrote. “This duty to safeguard her from harm extended beyond the simple duty while she was on his premises. It extended to a duty to make sure that she would not enter into such a state of intoxication while on his premises and on duty so as to interfere with her ability to safely drive home afterwards.”

Hunt’s employer and the pub where she continued drinking were determined to be jointly 25 per cent responsible for Hunt’s injuries.

Another case that personal injury lawyers may know, Jacobsen v. Nike Canada Ltd., returned a similar verdict. Jacobsen was severely injured in a single-car accident after drinking beer provided by the employer. In this case, too, the plaintiff visited a bar en route home; Nike Canada was still found 75 per cent liable for the injuries.

Avoid liability, reduce injury risk

 For businesses, the most effective means of avoiding employer host liability are also common-sense measures to reduce the likelihood of drunk driving injuries. For example: cap intake at two or three drinks; hire professional bartenders to serve alcoholic beverages; provide non-alcoholic options and plenty of food; offer taxi vouchers or Uber rides; and stridently promote responsible drinking at your staff parties.

With marijuana now legal in Canada, it is likely that employer host liability cases relating to marijuana intoxication will materialize in coming years. The courts will likely refer to Childs, Hunt, and Jacobsen to determine liability and compensation in these cases, meaning employer host liability will continue to lie between social host and commercial host liability for injuries relating to marijuana intoxication.

If you or someone you love has been injured as a result of impaired driving, contact Will Davidson LLP’s team of experienced personal injury lawyers today to learn how we can help.

 

Image credit: Jeremy Keith/Flickr

Contingency fees, explained

What is a contingency fee?

Contingency fee arrangements play an important role in the Canadian civil justice system. If you’ve researched personal injury lawyers in Ontario, you’re likely familiar with the term: contingency fee arrangements stipulate that lawyers will not receive payment until their client’s case has been successfully resolved.

Despite their prominent place in the legal system contingency fees are controversial and were prohibited in Canada until October 2004. Some critics believe contingency fees encourage lawsuits; others wonder whether personal injury lawyers should have a financial stake in the success of their clients’ disputes. Historically, contingency fees were banned in England, Scotland, Wales, and Canada due to the principle of ‘champerty and maintenance’: that strangers to a dispute should not fund legal costs as an investment for future rewards, according to a recent Ontario Trial Lawyers Association (OTLA) article. In some jurisdictions, including the Australian state of New South Wales, contingency fees are still banned.

The OTLA and the Law Society of Ontario (LSO) allow contingency fees based on the belief that they expand access to justice. The decision to permit them in 2004 was motivated in large part by the legal relationship between motor vehicle accident victims and insurance companies. Prior to the decision, plaintiffs were at an acute disadvantage in legal disputes involving complex issues – very few Canadians have access to the resources necessary to fund a lengthy legal battle with an insurance provider. The new rules allowed personal injury lawyers to take on complicated, arduous cases without accepting payment at the outset.

So, how exactly do contingency fees work? Simply: the client agrees that their lawyer will recover a percentage of the final settlement or award as payment. The percentage depends on the complexity of the case but should not exceed 50 per cent; the LSO prohibits lawyers from recovering more from the settlement than their clients.

Complex personal injury lawsuits are expensive to pursue. Contingency fees allow lawyers to work without cost restrictions; encourage lawyers to secure the maximum reasonable compensation for their clients; and allow the client to fund their recovery without the financial burden of simultaneously funding a lawsuit. Will Davidson LLP’s team of Oakville personal injury lawyers offers contingency fee arrangements for complex cases and believes the system provides improved access to justice for Ontario’s most vulnerable injury victims.

If you or a member of your family have been injured in an accident, contact the personal injury lawyers at Will Davidson LLP to arrange a free, no-obligation consultation. Our experienced team will assess the validity of your claim and provide guidance throughout the legal process.

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